13P Olbers

Closest to Sun on 2024 June 30 at 1.17AU.
Closest to Earth on 2024 July 24 at 1.90AU.
Maximum magnitude 7 in July 2024
Orbital period 69.5 years (Halley type)

By amazing circumstances, the other "once in a lifetime" comet 13P arrives at perihelion just 2 months after 12P Pons-Brooks.
Unfortunately, this will be a poor appearance, as the comet will locate on the opposite side of the Sun.
Therefore it will be situated very low to the horizon throughout its apparition, and favour northern hemisphere observers.
Despite the poor location, the comet is still expected to reach 7th magnitude in July 2024.
Southern hemisphere observers ers can catch a glimpse of it during April evening skies as it heads northwards,
then again post perihelion, commencing in early August.

April 2024
The comet is expected to brighten from magnitude 10.5 to 9 as it treks through Taurus, low in the evening sky.
Best view will occur early in the month before moonlight interferes from April 12.
After this date, the comet loses altitude and then remains a northern hemisphere object
until reappearing low over the western evening horizon during August 2024.


August 2024
13P Olbers returns to visibility for southerners and is best observed in the north-western evening sky,
but low altitude will make it difficult to see, particularly from southern Australia. The further north you are located, the better.
Conditions slowly improve as the month progresses.
It can be seen trekking through the constellations of Ursa Major and Coma Berenices, fading from magnitude 8.0 to 9.3.
Between August 15 to 18, it transits in front of the Coma Star Cluster Melotte 111 although moonlight will interfere.
On August 19, it will be 33’ SW of the impressive edge on galaxy NGC 4565.
The best period of visibility occurs from August 21, after the full moon.
On August 25-26, it will be within a degree NE of the Black Eye galaxy M64.
On August 31, it will be 1.2 degrees NE of Globular Cluster M53.

September 2024
13P Olbers is best observed in the north-western evening sky, but remains at low altitude making it difficult to see,
particularly from southern Australia. The further north you are located, the better.
It can be seen trekking through the constellations of Coma Berenices, Bootes and Virgo, fading from magnitude 9.3 to 10.8.
On September 1, it will be 1.2 degrees NE of magnitude 9.5 globular cluster NGC5053.
On September 4, it will be very close to magnitude 12 galaxy NGC5172.
Moonlight starts to interfere with viewing between September 6 to 20.
On September 30, it will be 18’ SW of magnitude 12 galaxy NGC5701

October 2024
The comet will become increasingly more difficult to observe, if it wasn’t already, as it encroaches twilight,
fading from magnitude 10.8 to 12.0. The further north you are, the better.
One interesting rendezvous event will occur on the evening of October 15.
The bright comet C/2023 A3 Tsuchinshan-ATLAS will pass a degree north of 13P, although this will be more easily captured photographically.
 

For our young readers, 13P Olbers will next return in March 2094
where it will be much better situated near the Earth’s vicinity and reach naked eye brightness.
 

My Observations: